Read more of your interests, read less insurance paperwork
Ditch the paperwork with Plum's group health insurance
Click here to know how Plum helps 3000+ HRs ➝

Employee pulse surveys have become increasingly popular in recent years as a tool for measuring employee engagement, satisfaction, and overall company culture. In this article, we will define employee pulse surveys, discuss why they are important, and explore their advantages and disadvantages. We will also provide tips for HR professionals on how to make the most of them.

Defining Employee Pulse Surveys

Employee pulse surveys are short, frequent surveys designed to measure engagement, satisfaction, and overall company culture. Unlike traditional annual surveys, which tend to be lengthy and infrequent, employee pulse surveys are shorter and can be conducted on a more frequent basis. The aim of such surveys is to provide organizations with real-time data on employee attitudes, which can be used to improve employee engagement, retention, and overall company culture.

Why Employee Pulse Surveys Are Important

EPS surveys are important for several reasons. Firstly, they provide organizations with real-time data on employee attitudes, which can be used to identify areas of improvement and take corrective action before problems become more serious. Secondly, they provide a more accurate picture of employee engagement and satisfaction than traditional annual surveys, as they are conducted more frequently and capture changes in employee attitudes over time. Finally, they can help to improve employee retention, as they provide organizations with insights into what matters most to employees and can be used to develop retention strategies.

Advantages and Disadvantages of Employee Pulse Surveys

There are several advantages and disadvantages 

Advantages include:

  1. Real-time Data: Employee pulse surveys provide organizations with real-time data on employee attitudes, allowing for quick identification of issues and corrective action.
  2. Improved Employee Engagement: By measuring employee engagement more frequently, organizations can take action to improve engagement and retain top talent.
  1. Increased Accountability: Employee pulse surveys hold managers accountable for employee engagement and satisfaction, as they provide data on how well managers are performing in these areas.
  1. Cost-Effective: They're are generally less expensive than traditional annual surveys, as they are shorter and can be conducted using online survey tools.

Disadvantages of employee pulse surveys include:

  1. Survey Fatigue: If employee pulse surveys are conducted too frequently or are too long, employees may experience survey fatigue, leading to decreased response rates and lower quality data.
  1. Lack of Depth: Because they tend to be shorter and less detailed than traditional annual surveys, EPS surveys may limit the depth of data collected.
  1. Limited Benchmarking: Since surveys are often unique to each organization, it can be difficult to benchmark against other organizations.

Making the Most of Employee Pulse Surveys

To make the most of employee surveys, HR professionals should follow these tips:

  1. Be Clear about the Purpose: Clearly communicate the purpose of the survey to employees, and explain how the data will be used to improve the organization.
  1. Keep Them Short and Frequent: Surveys should be short and frequent to avoid fatigue and capture changes in employee attitudes over time.
  1. Use the Data to Take Action: Use the data to identify areas of improvement and take action to address issues.
  1. Communicate Results: Share the results with employees and communicate the steps being taken to address issues.
  1. Benchmark against Best Practices: Benchmark against best practices and other organizations to identify areas for improvement and set goals for improvement.

Wrapping up

Employee pulse surveys are a valuable tool for HR professionals looking to measure employee engagement, satisfaction, and overall company culture. They provide real-time data on employee attitudes, which can be used to improve engagement, retain top talent, and develop retention strategies. 

While there are advantages and disadvantages, following best practices and using the data to take action can help HR professionals make the most of these surveys. By keeping surveys short and frequent, communicating results, and benchmarking against best practices, HR professionals can use surveys to improve the overall employee experience and drive business success.

In conclusion, employee pulse surveys are an important tool for HR professionals looking to measure employee engagement, satisfaction, and overall company culture. By providing real-time data on employee attitudes, these surveys can help organizations identify areas of improvement, take corrective action, and develop effective retention strategies. While there are advantages and disadvantages, following best practices and using the data to take action can help HR professionals make the most of these surveys and drive business success.